Getting us through | Kia tae ki tua

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The online engagement for this project has closed. Thanks for having your say.

Council adopted the Annual Plan 2020-2021 on 30 June 2020.

We are really pleased with the level of submissions and now have the busy job of collating all the feedback - thanks! Your feedback will help guide Council decision-making in finalising our budget and priorities for 2020/21, which will be adopted at the end of June.

Keep an eye on this page for evaluation reports and summary documents on Getting us through. We will publish these here as they are finalised.

Using Have your Say will be an important part of developing our City Plan and Long Term Plan 2021-2031. Our rubbish and recycling consultation will be starting in early July, so remember to check back with us. If you haven't registered already, make sure you register to have your say in future consultations.

Welcome to Hutt City Council’s Draft Annual Plan 2020-2021

Nau mai, rarau mai ki Te Mahere Pae Tawhiti Hukihuki a Te Kaunihera o Te Awakairangi 2020-2021

As a Council one of our most important roles is to plan for the future and do everything we can to ensure our city thrives. We need to make sure that we are prioritising the things that are important to you, and to do that, we need to know what you think.

Every three years we ask you about your ideas for Lower Hutt and produce a Long Term Plan. In the years between we prepare an Annual Plan - this covers the projects we have planned for the next 12 months, and our budget to achieve this.

An Annual Plan is usually an update to the LTP, but this year it was going to be different. We were planning on talking to you about major changes to our rubbish and recycling service, extra investments in infrastructure like roads and water, and changing our financial strategy to put us on a more secure footing going forward.

Like the rest of the world, we need to change our plans given the unprecedented situation arising from COVID-19. Businesses and households will be under significant pressure in the months ahead, and it is not tenable for us to proceed with ‘business as usual’.

We've pushed pause to think about our activity over the next year.

We've prepared an emergency one-year budget
We want to make sure our decisions support a recovering economy and don’t add extra financial stress for you.

We're prioritising essential work that can't wait
The one-year Draft Annual Plan will allow us to move forward on key work that will help our community, at a smaller scale.

We're keeping key projects moving
The budget still includes money for initial work on Naenae Pool, so when budgets are reviewed in future we are ready to go.

Council adopted the Annual Plan 2020-2021 on 30 June 2020.

We are really pleased with the level of submissions and now have the busy job of collating all the feedback - thanks! Your feedback will help guide Council decision-making in finalising our budget and priorities for 2020/21, which will be adopted at the end of June.

Keep an eye on this page for evaluation reports and summary documents on Getting us through. We will publish these here as they are finalised.

Using Have your Say will be an important part of developing our City Plan and Long Term Plan 2021-2031. Our rubbish and recycling consultation will be starting in early July, so remember to check back with us. If you haven't registered already, make sure you register to have your say in future consultations.

Welcome to Hutt City Council’s Draft Annual Plan 2020-2021

Nau mai, rarau mai ki Te Mahere Pae Tawhiti Hukihuki a Te Kaunihera o Te Awakairangi 2020-2021

As a Council one of our most important roles is to plan for the future and do everything we can to ensure our city thrives. We need to make sure that we are prioritising the things that are important to you, and to do that, we need to know what you think.

Every three years we ask you about your ideas for Lower Hutt and produce a Long Term Plan. In the years between we prepare an Annual Plan - this covers the projects we have planned for the next 12 months, and our budget to achieve this.

An Annual Plan is usually an update to the LTP, but this year it was going to be different. We were planning on talking to you about major changes to our rubbish and recycling service, extra investments in infrastructure like roads and water, and changing our financial strategy to put us on a more secure footing going forward.

Like the rest of the world, we need to change our plans given the unprecedented situation arising from COVID-19. Businesses and households will be under significant pressure in the months ahead, and it is not tenable for us to proceed with ‘business as usual’.

We've pushed pause to think about our activity over the next year.

We've prepared an emergency one-year budget
We want to make sure our decisions support a recovering economy and don’t add extra financial stress for you.

We're prioritising essential work that can't wait
The one-year Draft Annual Plan will allow us to move forward on key work that will help our community, at a smaller scale.

We're keeping key projects moving
The budget still includes money for initial work on Naenae Pool, so when budgets are reviewed in future we are ready to go.

The online engagement for this project has closed. Thanks for having your say.

  • Emergency one-year budget | Tahua ohotata mō te tau kotahi

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    07 May, 2020
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    Our proposed work programme and rates revenue changes

    In light of the unprecedented situation we are all in as a result of Covid-19, we have taken stock of the key projects planned in the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan (LTP). The focus now is on ensuring that investment in essential services can continue. This includes additional expenditure on Three Waters to do the basics like fixing water leaks, renewing some pipes in poor condition and to upgrade the Seaview Wastewater plant to address seismic issues.

    The emergency one-year budget is limited to getting us through this period of uncertainty. It does not address the need to invest in our city’s infrastructure at a sufficient level to have services and amenities that would be expected of a modern thriving city. We have made some tough choices which include $3 million of operational savings to help us “get through” this one year emergency budget.

    We were progressing plans to consult on significant proposed changes to the LTP. This included long term investment choices for Three Waters, Naenae pool and fitness centre development, Cycleways and Cross Valley Connections; together with proposed changes to funding solutions. These plans have been put on hold as a result of Covid-19, and will be progressed further when we develop our Long Term Plan 2021-2031 next year.

    The financial challenges remain and work will be required to review our financial strategy in the next LTP; this is likely to require increased revenue and borrowings to fund our priorities for the city. We will need to work towards finding a financially sustainable solution in the long-term where there is sufficient revenue to match the costs of delivering services for our growing city. A planned way forward on this will be further developed along with a redeveloped infrastructure strategy and other plans to provide financial stability to our operations and services.

    Proposed rates increase

    Given these difficult times and what is to come, we are proposing an emergency one-year budget for 2020-21 with an overall 3.8% increase in rates charges for ratepayers.

    This equates to an average increase of $2.35 per week per household or an average increase of $122 per annum. Investment in our three waters infrastructure makes up $84 of the average $122 per annum rise. The remaining $38 covers cost increases for all the other services provided by council.

    The proposed rates revenue increase is now much lower than previously contemplated. An additional 1% is allowed for growth in rating base but this will not be able to be confirmed until June.

    Impact on finances

    The lower rates revenue rise means less revenue at a time when operating expenditure has increased by $16 million compared to what was projected for 2020-21 in our LTP. This is largely due to unbudgeted or higher than anticipated costs for three waters repairs and renewals, depreciation and insurance, the review of the District Plan, preparatory work for Naenae Pool, our homelessness strategy, sports initiatives for tennis and gymnastics and the development stimulus package.

    Crucially, the proposed rates revenue increase means that we will stay within the borrowing limits set in our Financial Strategy for 2020-21. However on the down side there is a $9 million projected deficit for 2020-21 rather than the $4.4 million surplus projected in the LTP. The gaps in Council revenue to meet ongoing operational costs will be funded through additional debt as a one-off solution.

    Our future approach

    Decisions on funding for projects from 2021-22 and beyond will be made during the LTP 2021-31 process which concludes in June 2021. Modernising the city’s rubbish and recycling service was planned for implementation in July 2021. Consultation on this has now been deferred and this new timetable still enables us to make the necessary changes to have a system that works for everyone.

    In the coming year we will continue to progress the work on the rates split to ensure that the balance between residential ratepayers and commercial and other ratepayers remains relatively equitable while we progress the full review of the Revenue and Financing Policy.

    We’re also ensuring that those who are using our services are meeting, within reason, the costs associated with providing that service. We have reviewed our fees and charges and are proposing changes that are detailed in the draft Annual Plan.

    See the Engagement Document (PDF 5.2 MB) for more information.

    This infographic shows some of the major projects, and areas where we've made savings.

    Have your say

    We need your feedback before we can make these decisions.Have your say by filling out the feedback form.

  • Rates split | Panonitanga Rēti (Totoe)

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    07 May, 2020
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    Split of rates between different property groups.

    Over the years we have been working towards making sure the share of rates paid by residents, commercial property owners, utilities and people living in rural areas is spread more equitably.

    We adopted a rates differential policy in 2012, planning that 60% of the general rate would be paid by residential ratepayers. Over time, there’s been a significant transfer of rates from the commercial sector to residents.

    Rates are based on how much a property is worth, as determined by Quotable Value Limited (QV). The 2019 property revaluations showed that residential property values increased more than commercial properties. This means that residents could potentially pick up 65% of the overall rates bill in 2020/21.

    We want to make sure that the amount of rates paid by our various ratepayer groups reflects an equitable share.

    A full review of our Revenue and Financing Policy is planned for Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and will include a review of the rating differentials.

    See page 12 of the Engagement Document (PDF 2.8MB) for a graph showing the change over the last ten years in the allocation of rates charges between property rating categories.

    Options

    As an interim solution for 2020/21 there are three options to discuss. Read through the options below and see the Engagement Document for more information.

    Option 1: Hold 2019/20 position based on percentage splits

    This option is Council’s preferred option.

    Keep the allocation of general rates at the same percentage levels between all property rating groups as in 2019/20.

    New rating differentials would need to be set for the 2020/2021 year.

    • This would keep the percentage amounts paid towards general rates at the same level as the 2019/20 rating year, that is, not continuing with the direction of reducing the proportion of rates paid by businesses.
    • While individual properties may still see an increase in the rates payable, this approach will generally see most property groups having an increase of a similar percentage.
    • This is holding the existing allocations until a full review can be completed as part of the 2021-2031 LTP.
    • The impact on the average residential property would be around $28 per annum lower rates when compared to option 3.

    Option 2: Freeze the differentials to be the same as 2019/20

    Freeze the differential transition for a year, that is, use the 2019/20 differentials rather than those planned for 2020/21.

    • The current situation is directly comparable to 2017/18 when the decision was made to freeze the differential transition for a year.
    • The rates differential adjustment would mean the share of general rates paid by different rating groups would change but less significantly than provided for in the current policy (option 3).
    • This is holding the existing differential transitions until a full review can be completed as part of the 2021-2031 LTP.
    • The impact on homeowners would be around $21 per annum lower rates when compared to option 3.

    Option 3: Status quo – Continue with differential adjustment

    Continue with the differential transition adjustment to the share of general rates paid by commercial, residential and rural ratepayers.

    • Homeowners would pay an increased percentage of the general rates.
    • When this policy of adjustment was adopted, it was not intended to have the impact it is having now, that is, the residential share of the general rates is over 60%.

    Have your say

    We need your feedback before we can make any decisions. Have your say by filling out the feedback form.